Litchfield Reviews You’ll Get Yours by William Ard

LEP.CO.UK - Youll Get Yours by William Ard

Mysteriously lured by thieves into taking part in a ransom delivery, an honest Manhattan private-eye becomes involved in a perilous blackmail plot and the prime suspect in the murder of a stripper.

First published in 1952 by paperback publisher Lion Books under the pseudonym Thomas Wills, You’ll Get Yours is a hardboiled Fifties tale of theft, blackmail, murder and frame-up by the popular but long-forgotten novelist William Ard.

Before becoming a prolific writer of more than thirty novels, Ard worked briefly for a local detective agency, as a copywriter for an advertising agency, and as a publicity writer for Warner Brothers Pictures.

He penned his first novel in 1951 and went on to create several distinctive series detectives published under four pseudonyms as well as his real name.

Considered one of the best writers of private-eye detective fiction during his lifetime, he frequently received glowing reviews from the New York Times book critic Anthony Boucher who praised him for his technical skill, complexity of plot and counterplot, vigour and originality, and for the warmth and tenderness of his hardboiled detectives.

This new reprint of Ard’s second novel marks a welcome return to print for the first-rate writer of crime, mystery and Westerns who died aged 37 from cancer while at the height of his career.

Swift and dramatic, You’ll Get Yours is a worthy, quick read that is helped by a lean plot, terse writing, and a likeable, upright, hardboiled protagonist.

My review of You’ll Get Yours is featured today in the Lancashire Post and syndicated to 20 newspapers in the UK. The full review can be found at the web link below and elsewhere.

Read more at: https://www.lep.co.uk/lifestyle/books/you-ll-get-yours-by-william-ard-book-review-1-9313825

Litchfield Reviews Ed Lacy’s ‘The Men from the Boys’

LEP.CO.UK - The Men from the Boys by Ed Lacy

Hardboiled crime from 1956 (The Men from the Boys)

“Frank, provocative and untamed, Marty Bond is an impressively colourful, distinctive character whose presence makes this competent mystery novel infinitely more enjoyable. He’s bigoted and morally deficient, and when he doesn’t wound with his tongue, he lets his powerful fists do the talking.

Lacy expertly manages to bring a sympathetic aspect to the mean, hard-edged Marty, and for all his crude, derogative talk, the reader can’t help but root for him and want to find out how the story ends.”

Featured today in the Lancashire Post is my review of The Men from the Boys, an entertaining standalone mystery by acclaimed crime novelist Ed Lacy, the pseudonym of Edgar Award-winning American novelist Len Zinberg who died in 1968. You can read the full review at the web link below or at other syndicated newspapers.

https://www.lep.co.uk/lifestyle/books/book-review-the-men-from-the-boys-by-ed-lacy-1-9038545

Litchfield Reviews Day In, Day Out by Héctor Aguilar Camín for the Lancashire Post

LEP.CO.UK - Day In, Day Out by Héctor Aguilar Camín

“Distinguished Mexican author, journalist, and historian Héctor Aguilar Camín explores a dissolute writer’s lifelong obsession with a nefarious temptress in this hardboiled tale of lust, police corruption and murder in Mexico City.

Day In, Day Out, originally published in 2016 as Toda La Vida, is Aguilar Camín’s second work of fiction to be translated into English. Journalist Chandler Thompson, who translated the work from Spanish, is also responsible for the English language translation of Camín’s acclaimed novel Death in Veracruz.

Narrated by a professional writer named Serrano, a man who does not digress, mince words or cleave to his biases, Day In, Day Out recounts his passionate, sporadic affair with Liliana Montoyo, a beautiful, promiscuous woman who makes a habit of reducing men to their primal state, turning them into violent and primitive lovers.

Day In, Day Out is a noteworthy crime noir full of deception, ulterior motives, unreliable memories and secrets and lies. It is also a compelling love story.

The unabashed and obsessively driven Serrano is both a victim and a menace, hopelessly drawn to a woman as unstable as himself. Empty but right-minded when apart, they are both unable to control their natural impulses or curb their self-destructive behaviour when together. Theirs is a perpetually dangerous, doomed relationship, full of passion and liberation, heartache and trouble.

The eloquent and philosophical Héctor Aguilar Camín, recipient of numerous national literary awards, has produced once again a masterful literary work that clearly shows us why he is one of Mexico’s most revered writers.”

My review of Day In, Day Out by Héctor Aguilar Camín is published today in the Lancashire Post, and syndicated to 25 newspapers across the UK.

Read the full review here